How the bees got their stingers

an Ojibwe-Odawa legend
  • 40 Pages
  • 4.84 MB
  • 4563 Downloads
  • English
by
Ojibwe Cultural Foundation , Manitoulin Island, Ont
Indians of North America -- Folklore -- Juvenile literature., Ojibwa Indians -- Folklore -- Juvenile litera
Statementwritten by Mary Lou Fox ; translated by Alex Fox ; illustrations by James Simon.
GenreJuvenile literature.
ContributionsSimon, James.
The Physical Object
Pagination40 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18186229M

Even today, bees have stingers that kill. But clever Jupiter set things up so that the bee would be the one that the stinger kills. Jupiter was true to his word, the bee got a sting that kills, and Aesop’s punchline, or moral, to his story is: “Evil wishes, like chickens, come home to roost.”.

How the Honey Bee got their stinger A Cherokee Legend.

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Back in ancient times when the people were more pure and could converse with the animals and the Creator would visit with them, the people asked the Creator for something that was 'sweet' to the taste. How the Bees Got their Stingers [Mary Lou Fox] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Only female worker honey bees have stingers, or ovipositors, which are a part of their reproductive anatomy. The stinger has barbs or a hook on its tip that sink into the skin of the victim. The bee will attempt to fly away, but it will rip part of its abdomen in the.

Bees see all colors except the color red. Killer bees have been known to chase people for over a 1/4 mile once they get excited and aggressive. Certain species of bees die after stinging because their stingers, which are attached to their abdomen, have little barbs or hooks on them.

When this type of bee tries to fly away after stinging. How the bees got their stingers: an Ojibwe-Odawa legend / written by Mary Lou Fox ; translated by Alex Fox ; illustrations by James Simon.

imprint Manitoulin Island, Ont.: Ojibwe Cultural Foundation,   It’s only the social bees, such as the honeybee, that lose the stinger; solitary bees do not lose it, and can go on to sting again.

So you are right—not only some, but I think most bee species, after stinging one victim, live on to sting more if How the bees got their stingers book.

A bee's abdomen does have one notable appendage -- the stinger, which is a modified ovipositor, or egg depositor. This stinger combines a poison sac with sharp lancets, which deliver the venom that the bee produces using its venom gland.

Many scientists believe that bees inherited their venom from their wasp-like ancestors, used their ovipositors to lay their eggs in the bodies of other : Tracy V.

Wilson. Pictured: Book Cover showing a jar of honey on a window ledge. By Sue Monk Kidd. This book was recommended to me. At that time, I thought bees. Really. A whole book about bees. Bees are interesting, I give you that. Pretty, too, as long as they keep their stingers to themselves.

They are productive, organized, and contribute to the world. See. Honey bees and bumble bees use their stingers strictly for defense. Bees that are away from the hive foraging will rarely sting unless they are stepped on or unnecessarily aggravated.

They are usually too busy searching for pollen and nectar to be bothered by a curious observer or passerby. The Bees did as the Creator said, they ate the briars and these were transformed into stingers. The Flower People created an entire briar patch around the Bee’s tree.

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The next day, the people came back and started toward the Bee’s hive for more syrup; but the briars around the tree scratched and tore at their bodies. The majority of bees (especially ones you see flying around) are called worker bees.

All worker bees are female. Male bees are called drones, and will fertilize the queen's eggs. Drones do not have stingers. Only female bees have stingers, because stingers are actually modified ovipositors (a tube female insects use to lay their eggs).

Why I'm Afraid of Bees by R.L. Stine stars. Why I'm Afraid of Bees is one of those Goosebumps novels that people don't talk much about. It's a rare novel that didn't even gain a TV episode, which is saying something, especially since this is an earlier Goosebumps novel.

I was going in with low expectations and my expectations were met/5. The Secret Life of Bees. By Sue Monk Kidd.

This book was recommended to me. At that time, I thought bees. Really. A whole book about bees. Bees are interesting, I give you that.

Pretty, too, as long as they keep their stingers to themselves. They are productive, organized, and contribute to the world. See. I know a little about bees already. Stingers are actually modified ovipositors (structures for depositing eggs), so only females have them.

In honey bees, only workers (all female) have barbs, and the barbs only catch to pull out the stinger if the victim has thick enough skin. Honey bees are the only bee species that die after stinging.

However, honey bees sometimes survive after stinging if the victim’s skin is thin and doesn’t hold the barbed end of the stinger. This doesn’t happen often, though, because honey bee stingers are designed to stick in the skin of the victim to release as much venom as possible.

Barton’s illustrations range from loose, cartoon-style sketches of bee encounters (Edgar got stung recently, and the image recapping the incident features labels that include “the ouch,” “brave tears,” “super mean bee”) to careful close-ups of different Brand: Penguin Young Readers Group.

This pheromone (which has an odour similar to banana) excites the surrounding bees into attacking the threat. Only female bees have stingers.

In the case of honey bees, the worker bee has a barbed stinger that causes it to become imbedded into the skin of an animal (including people). O.K., so this is the THIRD fact book I got about bees, and you know what.

First, it was supposed to be the hardest, but it wasnt THAT hard. And second, the other two had REAL pictures but hardly any facts, but THIS one was PAINTINGS and it had the MOST facts. Like about why they sting, and how they sting.

And did you know when bees sting, they die/5. How the Bee got Her Sting. January 9, by beelore. The Queen of a hive of bees on Mount Hymettus rose up to Olympus to make an offering of honey to almighty Zeus.

Zeus, delighted, swore that he would give her anything she asked for. “Wise and powerful is. Many people mistakenly believe that those ‘cute’ fat bees called bumble bees are friendly, however the females have stingers and will strike if they feel threatened.

There are o different types of bees and 70% of them make their homes at ground level or just under the soil, which is why it is not unusual for dogs to be stung.

The stinger of the normal honeybee is no stranger to me. The venom gland will be at the end away from to part stunk in your skin and pumping away more poison, so care should be used to remove it so you don’t force more pain.

If you were driving. Really. A whole book about bees. Bees are interesting, I give you that. Pretty, too, as long as they keep their stingers to themselves. They are productive, organized, and contribute to the world. See. I know a little about bees already.

But a whole book about them. The Bees did as the Creator said, they ate the briars and these were transformed into stingers. The Flower People created an entire briar patch around the Bee's tree. The next day, the people came back and started toward the Bee's hive for more syrup; but the briars around the tree scratched and tore at their bodies.

The bees in Minecraft work a lot like one would expect them to if you’re at least somewhat knowledgeable about bees’ stingers and their proficiency for spreading pollen and honey habits. These Author: Tanner Dedmon. Bumble bees can sting repeatedly and will not die afterwards, since their stingers are not barbed and won’t dislodge from the body.

The honey bee on the other hand can only sting once because of the barbed stinger, and usually dies thereafter. Bees can enter a beehive from any side, but exit only from the front. One-way bee-gates can be made in this way. Bees return to their nest when it rains and when it is night.

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Bees stay in their nest or hive for at least game ticks (2 minutes) before coming back out. Bees that come out. Honey bees are social bees, and their hives are organized by a caste system – the queen bee, the drones or male bees and the worker bees. While the queen bee has a smooth stinger, she mostly uses it against rival queen bees.

Worker bees have barbed stingers that they use for defending the hive. All worker bees are sterile females. The unseen narrator’s enthusiastic, in-your-face lobbying on behalf of bees and what they are capable of is a big part of the book’s charm: “Maybe I just need to remind you how weird and. Whereas the honey bee stings you once and then dies, yellow jackets, wasps, and hornets can retract their stingers without hurting themselves, and do it all over again.

That’s why it’s so horrific if you step on a yellow jacket’s nest: the entire hive responds, and given that a single hive can contain thousands of bees, you can get mighty. No, not all bees have stingers. Stingers are adapted ovipositors. Males don't lay eggs, so they don't have stingers.

Before the Europeans came to the Americas the Incas and Mayans kept stingless bees for their honey. There are species of both stinging and stingless bees. Males are always stingless no matter the species.A bumblebee (or bumble bee, bumble-bee, or humble-bee) is any of over species in the genus Bombus, part of Apidae, one of the bee families.

This genus is the only extant group in the tribe Bombini, though a few extinct related genera (e.g., Calyptapis) are known from are found primarily in higher altitudes or latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, although they are also found Class: Insecta.